xiǎo lóng bǎo (小籠包)

Also known as “soup dumplings” these tasty little buns are filled with broth and meat or vegetables and cooked in bamboo steamers. Pictured here are dumplings from Din Tai Fung, a restaurant famous for their xiǎo lóng bǎo. At a nicer restaurant such as this, 5 pork xiǎo lóng bǎo will go for 105元 whereas…

grilled shrimp (烤蝦)

The author would like to preface this post by saying that she doesn’t enjoy eating food with identifiable faces. As Taiwan is an island nation, a lot of their local food involves seafood. A fairly common street food is grilled shrimp. Amongst other proteins, shrimps are placed on skewers and grilled fresh in front of…

braised beef rice (紅燒牛肉饭)

Similar in flavor to braised beef noodles, this is a dish you can find easily on the streets of Taiwan. Pictured above is a cheap version (40元 or roughly $1.50), but don’t let the price discourage you. The meat, while not the leanest cut, is flavorful and satisfying, and you can never go wrong with…

braised beef noodle soup (紅燒牛肉麵湯)

Taiwan’s national specialty, braised beef noodle soup, is delicious even in the hottest of weather. There is a wide variety of beef noodle shops ranging from upscale like in one of Mayfull’s restaurants (as pictured above) to quick and cheap like the shop in Providence University’s cafeteria. As the name implies, this is a beef…

tips and tricks

Don’t drink the tap water! We’re all told this before we arrive but it’s definitely something to be aware of. Most places will have filtered water stations but it’s a great idea to carry a water bottle with you. Use whatever Chinese you know! Even if Taiwanese people have a hard time understanding you, they’ll…